The Thai Revolution: The changes in agriculture in the kibbutzim and moshavim of the Arava in the 1990s - מרג'ורי סטרום (ג'יג'י) ז"ל

The Thai Revolution: The changes in agriculture in the kibbutzim and moshavim of the Arava in the 1990s - מרג'ורי סטרום (ג'יג'י) ז"ל

Imagine a region separated by geography, climate, and ideology
from the economic and social forces that affect the rest of the
country. Physical isolation prohibits inhabitants of this area from
utilizing many resources available to all other citizens, including
inexpensive labor markets and direct consumer markets. On the
other hand, the region contains a water supply unavailable to the
rest of the country and unaffected by local weather conditions,
and is naturally quarantined from agricultural diseases.
Imagine that this region, while climatically and geographically
unified, is divided demographically and politically into two
distinct subregions, differentiated by their ideological approach
to social and economic organizations.
Despite the region’s isolation, it is connected to the rest of the
country legally and economically. It depends on government
funding and support to develop, and trades in the same markets
as other citizens. It is subject to government restrictions such as
production quotas and labor laws.
One day, the powers-that-be decide to change the rules. The
support once provided to agriculture is lowered considerably,
while simultaneously a supply of low-cost labor previously
denied to this area is made available. Although many of the
ideological differences between the two regions have dissolved,
the institutional and cultural differences remain in place, causing
the inhabitants to react differently to the changed conditions.

מאת :

תאריך פרסום: 
דצמבר, 2016
מהדורה: 
(Negev, Dead Sea and Arava Studies 8 (4
Pages: 
101-107

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